Thursday, March 23, 2017

[PaleoEntomology • 2017] Yijenplatycnemis huangi • Extreme Adaptations for Probable Visual Courtship Behaviour in A Cretaceous Dancing Damselfly


Yijenplatycnemis huangi
 Zheng, Nel, Jarzembowski, Chang, Zhang, Xia, Liu & Wang, 2017

Illustration by D. Zheng. DOI: 10.1038/srep44932 

Abstract
Courtship behaviours, frequent among modern insects, have left extremely rare fossil traces. None are known previously for fossil odonatans. Fossil traces of such behaviours are better known among the vertebrates, e.g. the hypertelic antlers of the Pleistocene giant deer Megaloceros giganteus. Here we describe spectacular extremely expanded, pod-like tibiae in males of a platycnemidid damselfly from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Such structures in modern damselflies, help to fend off other suitors as well as attract mating females, increasing the chances of successful mating. Modern Platycnemidinae and Chlorocyphidae convergently acquired similar but less developed structures. The new findings provide suggestive evidence of damselfly courtship behaviour as far back as the mid-Cretaceous. These data show an unexpected morphological disparity in dancing damselfly leg structure, and shed new light on mechanisms of sexual selection involving intra- and intersex reproductive competition during the Cretaceous.


Figure 5: Reconstruction showing the courtship behaviour of Yijenplatycnemis huangi gen. et sp. nov. from the mid-Cretaceous tropical forest in Burma (drawn by Daran Zheng). 

Figure 1: Yijenplatycnemis huangi gen. et sp. nov.
Holotype (NIGP164757); photograph (A) and line drawing (B) of specimen (drawn by DZ). Paratype (BA16200); dorsal view (C) and anterior view (D) of specimen. 

Systematic palaeontology

Order Odonata Fabricius, 1793
Suborder Zygoptera Selys-Longchamps, 1854
Superfamily Coenagrionoidea Kirby, 1890

Family Platycnemididae Yakobson & Bianchi, 1905
Subfamily Palaeodisparoneurinae Poinar et al. 2011

Yijenplatycnemis huangi gen. et sp. nov

Etymology: The generic name is after Mr Huang Yijen, the donator of the type specimen, and the typical genus Platycnemis. The specific name is after Mr. Huang Yijen. Gender masculine.



Diagnosis: Very small damselfly, complete wing length about 11–14 mm; DC closed and quadrangular with MAb perpendicular to MAa; five postnodal and five postsubnodal crossveins present, somewhat aligned; only one postnodal crossvein present distal of Pt; midfork slightly basal of N; RP1 with strong angle below very long pterostigmal brace; area between RA and RP1 greatly widened distal of Pt; IR2 aligned with Sn; IR1 short, originating below Pt; MA long, ending on posterior wing margin below base of RP2; MP short, one or two cells long; CuA reduced to oblique vein; Pt very small, less than half length of surrounding cells; all tibiae spectacularly expanded, covered with two brown bands, in pod-like sclerite except on metatibiae where of semi-circular shape.

.....


Daran Zheng, André Nel, Edmund A. Jarzembowski, Su-Chin Chang, Haichun Zhang, Fangyuan Xia, Haoying Liu & Bo Wang. 2017. Extreme Adaptations for Probable Visual Courtship Behaviour in A Cretaceous Dancing Damselfly.  Scientific Reports. 7, 44932. DOI: 10.1038/srep44932

Courtship behavior trapped in 100-million-year-old amber
https://eurekalert.org/e/7kZx via @EurekAlert

[Botany • 2017] New Species; Peperomia sirindhorniana รักตะนิล, P. heptaphylla, P. masuthoniana & P. multisurcula and A Reinstatement in Peperomia (Piperaceae) from Thailand


รักตะนิล |  Peperomia sirindhorniana Suwanph. & Chantar.


Summary
Four new species of Peperomia (Piperaceae) from Thailand, namely Peperomia heptaphyllaPeperomia masuthonianaPeperomia multisurcula and Peperomia sirindhorniana are described and illustrated. The reinstatement of Peperomia dindygulensis is also proposed with supporting morphological evidence.

Key words: IUCN vulnerability; morphology; taxonomy


Taxonomic Treatment


• Peperomia heptaphylla Suwanph. & Hodk., sp. nov. 


Type: Thailand, Prachuap Kiri Khan
Etymology. The specific epithet refers to the number of leaves per node.
Vernacular Name: เบี้ยประจวบ - Bia Pra Chuap.


• Peperomia masuthoniana Suwanph. & Chantar. sp. nov. 


Type: Thailand, Chiang Mai, Doi Chiangdao
Etymology: The specific epithet honours Associate Prof. Sumon Masuthon (1952 – present), Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, who encouraged the first author to intensively study the family Piperaceae for the Flora of Thailand project.
Vernacular Name: เบี้ยเชียงดาว - Bia Chiang Dao.



• Peperomia multisurcula Suwanph. & Hodk. sp. nov. 
Type: Thailand, Nan
Etymology: The specific epithet refers to the stems that have many clumps, and many main stems and branchlets.
Vernacular Name: เบี้ยสะปัน - Bia Sa Pan (Nan).




• Peperomia sirindhorniana Suwanph. & Chantar., sp. nov. 
Type: Thailand, Loei, Nong Hin, Pha Hin Ngam

Conservation Status. This species is uncommon and only a few specimens have been collected from the border area between Loei and Khon Kaen provinces in northeastern Thailand. The populations are narrowly distributed in an area of karst limestone and not in a protected area. The populations are threatened by farming and deforestation. The status of Peperomia sirindhorniana is assessed as Critically Endangered (CR), according to IUCN (2011) criteria and the authors consider a category of B1b to be appropriate.

Etymology: The specific epithet honours to H.R.H. Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Mahidol who initiated the Plant Genetic Conservation Project to develop the personnel and plant genetics resources for the maintenance of plant varieties, and for the development to be advantageous for farmers and the business sector of Thailand.
Vernacular Name: Rak-Ta-Nil.


Notes:
 We discovered some unidentified specimens (T. Smitinand & H. Sleumer 1131 in BKF and L that were collected from Pha Nok Khao, Khon Kaen province, northeastern Thailand. They are similar to Peperomia pellucida in gross morphology but differ in some characters. We have subsequently collected living specimens from a nearby locality and they are easily recognised as a species new to science. The distinguishing characteristics of P. sirindhorniana are its red or reddish petioles and stems, and its bright to dark green leaves when fresh (subcoriaceous when dry) as opposed to pale green (membranous when dried) in P. pellucida. Furthermore, its fruits are larger than P. pellucida and are ovoid with a beaked apex formed from the style and it has densely acute papillae on the fruit surface.


Reinstatement
• Peperomia dindygulensis Miq.

Etymology: The specific epithet refers to Dindygul (the city in the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu) from which the type specimens were collected.
Vernacular Name: ผักป้องแดง - Phak Pong Daeng (Chanthaburi).


Chalermpol Suwanphakdee, Trevor R. Hodkinson and Pranom Chantaranothai. 2017. New Species and A Reinstatement in Peperomia (Piperaceae) from Thailand.
  Kew Bulletin. 72(1);  DOI: 10.1007/s12225-016-9662-5



  รักตะนิล ซึ่งมีความหมายว่า เขียว-แดง เนื่องจากพืชชนิดนี้มีลำ ต้นและก้านใบสีแดง มีใบสีเขียวเข้มหรือสีมรกต


[Crustacea • 2017] Haberma tingkok • A New Species of Micro-mangrove Crab of the Genus Haberma Ng & Schubart, 2002 (Brachyura, Sesarmidae) from Hong Kong


Haberma tingkok 
Cannicci & Ng, 2017
 

Abstract
The sesarmid genus Haberma Ng & Schubart, 2002, currently contains two species of small mangrove crabs with the first two pairs of the male ambulatory legs possessing characteristic subchelate dactyli and propodi. A new species, Haberma tingkok, is here described from Hong Kong. It can be separated from H. nanum Ng & Schubart, 2002 (from Singapore), and H. kamora Rahayu & Ng, 2005 (from Indonesian Papua) by its carapace shape, proportions of the ambulatory legs, and structures of the male pleon and male first gonopod.

Keywords: Crab, Hong Kong, new species, Sesarmidae, subtropical mangroves, taxonomy


Systematics

Family Sesarmidae Dana, 1851

Genus Haberma Ng & Schubart, 2002

Haberma tingkok sp. n.


Figure 1. Haberma tingkok sp. n., colour in life, holotype ♂ (8.5 × 8.2 mm) (ZRC 2016.620). A dorsal view B ventral view. 


Etymology: The species is named after the Ting Kok mangrove area, which has been designated a “Site of Special Scientific Interest” in Hong Kong. The name is used as a noun in apposition.

Ecology: The specimens were found climbing trees of Kandelia obovata Sheue, Liu & Yong, 2003, and Aegiceras corniculatus (L.) Bianco, 1837, in the mid intertidal area of the Ting Kok mangrove stand, in Tolo Harbour. The area is the largest mangrove stand on the eastern coast of Hong Kong and is largely dominated by K. obovata trees, up to 3 m tall. All specimens, including the ovigerous females, were collected at a height of approximately 1.5–1.8 m above the substrate, walking on the bark of the branches at ebbing and low tides.


Stefano Cannicci and Peter L. K. Ng. 2017. A New Species of Micro-mangrove Crab of the Genus Haberma Ng & Schubart, 2002 (Crustacea, Brachyura, Sesarmidae) from Hong Kong.
 ZooKeys. 662: 67-78. DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.662.11908

[Ichthyology • 2017] Understanding Morphological Variability in A Taxonomic Context in Chilean Diplomystids (Teleostei: Siluriformes), Including the Description of A New Species, Diplomystes incognitus


Diplomystes incognitus Arratia & Quezada-Romegialli, 2017

Figure 18: Diplomystes incognitus sp. nov. in a recreation of its natural environment.
Young individual, ca. 93 mm SL, from Ñuble River at Nahueltoro Bridge, Itata Basin.

Abstract

Following study of the external morphology and its unmatched variability throughout ontogeny and a re-examination of selected morphological characters based on many specimens of diplomystids from Central and South Chile, we revised and emended previous specific diagnoses and consider Diplomystes chilensis, D. nahuelbutaensis, D. camposensis, and Olivaichthys viedmensis (Baker River) to be valid species. Another group, previously identified as Diplomystes sp., D. spec., D. aff. chilensis, and D. cf. chilensis inhabiting rivers between Rapel and Itata Basins is given a new specific name (Diplomystes incognitus) and is diagnosed. An identification key to the Chilean species, including the new species, is presented. All specific diagnoses are based on external morphological characters, such as aspects of the skin, neuromast lines, and main lateral line, and position of the anus and urogenital pore, as well as certain osteological characters to facilitate the identification of these species that previously was based on many internal characters. Diplomystids below 150 mm standard length (SL) share a similar external morphology and body proportions that make identification difficult; however, specimens over 150 mm SL can be diagnosed by the position of the urogenital pore and anus, and a combination of external and internal morphological characters. According to current knowledge, diplomystid species have an allopatric distribution with each species apparently endemic to particular basins in continental Chile and one species (O. viedmensis) known only from one river in the Chilean Patagonia, but distributed extensively in southern Argentina.


Figure 18: Diplomystes incognitus sp. nov. in a recreation of its natural environment.
 Young individual, ca. 93 mm SL, from Ñuble River at Nahueltoro Bridge, Itata Basin.  
 


Diagnosis. Diplomystid that is distinguished from all congeners by the possession of the skin of head, body, and fins densely covered by round, short papillae giving the skin a blackberry-like or verrucose aspect in large individuals; with a short head, slightly squarish and as long as broad (versus slightly longer more triangular-shaped head); high dorsal fin, ca. 20% of SL (range 17–25%) and triangularly-shaped (versus slightly rhomboidal); maxilla with 7–9 teeth (vs. 8–13 in D. chilensis, 11–13 in D. nahuelbutaensis, and 12–19 in D. camposensis); with 10 infraorbital bones, as in D. nahuelbutaensis, but the dorsalmost compound bone is absent; urogenital pore and anus placed between posterior tips of pelvic fins as in D. chilensis (vs. urogenital pore and anus placed between pelvic fins or in between the distal tips of pelvics and anal fin); and absence of pores of axillary gland with occasionally four on one side of body (vs. two or three pores).

Etymology. The specific name incognitus is in reference that recognition of the species was obscured by the assumption that Diplomystes chilensis also extended south of Maipo Basin.

Geographical distribution. In Rapel, Mataquito, Maule, and Itata Basins.


 Gloria Arratia​​ and Claudio Quezada-Romegialli​. 2017.  Understanding Morphological Variability in A Taxonomic Context in Chilean Diplomystids (Teleostei: Siluriformes), Including the Description of A New Species.  PeerJ 5:e2991.  DOI: 10.7717/peerj.2991


[Mollusca • 2017] Coat of Many Colours — DNA Reveals Polymorphism of Mantle Patterns and Colouration in Caribbean Cyphoma Röding, 1798 (Gastropoda, Ovulidae)


Figure 1: In situ photographs of Cyphoma species. Cyphoma species showing different mantle patterns and colouration.

(A) 
Cyphoma gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (B) C. gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (E) Csignatum on Plexaurella dichotoma (see Reijnen, Hoeksema & Gittenberger, 2010: Fig. 1B) (F) Juvenile C. signatum on Gorgonia ventalina (G) Cyphoma “black morph” on Eunicea tourneforti (H) C. mcgintyi from Florida, USA.
Photos: (A–G) B.T. Reijnen, all from Curaçao; (H) Florida Museum of Natural History.

Abstract

The iconic gastropod genus Cyphoma is commonly observed in the Caribbean, where it lives in association with various octocorallian hosts. Each species in the genus Cyphoma has a unique, characteristic mantle pattern and colouration, which separates the valid taxa. Because of its abundance and recognisability Cyphoma gibbosum has been used as a model organism in several studies concerning allelochemicals, reef degradation, and physical defence mechanisms. Molecular analyses based on four molecular markers (COI, 16S, H3 and 28S) for three Cyphoma species (C. gibbosum, C. mcgintyi, C. signatum) and an unidentified black morph, collected from three localities in the Caribbean, show that they represent morphological varieties of a single, genetically homogeneous species. This outcome is in agreement with previous anatomical studies. As a result C. mcgintyi and C. signatum are synonymised with C. gibbosum, which is a key result for future work using C. gibbosum as a model organism. The striking morphological differences in mantle pattern and colouration are hypothesised to be the result of one of three possible scenarios: rapid divergence, supergenes (including balanced polymorphism), or incipient speciation.

Figure 1: In situ photographs of Cyphoma species. Cyphoma species showing different mantle patterns and colouration
(A) Cyphoma gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (B) C. gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (C) C. gibbosum with atypical mantle pattern (only dots around mantle edges) on Briareum asbestinum (D) C. cf. allenae on Antillogorgia americana (E) Csignatum on Plexaurella dichotoma (see Reijnen, Hoeksema & Gittenberger, 2010: Fig. 1B) (F) Juvenile C. signatum on Gorgonia ventalina (G) Cyphoma “black morph” on Eunicea tourneforti (H) C. mcgintyi from Florida, USA. Photos: (A–G) B.T. Reijnen, all from Curaçao; (H) Florida Museum of Natural History. 

Figure 1: In situ photographs of Cyphoma species. Cyphoma species showing different mantle patterns and colouration
 
(A) Cyphoma gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (B) C. gibbosum on Pseudoplexaura sp. (C) C. gibbosum with atypical mantle pattern (only dots around mantle edges) on Briareum asbestinum (D) C. cf. allenae on Antillogorgia americana 

Photos: (A–D) B.T. Reijnen, all from Curaçao. DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3018 

Figure 1: In situ photographs of Cyphoma species. Cyphoma species showing different mantle patterns and colouration. (E) Csignatum on Plexaurella dichotoma (see Reijnen, Hoeksema & Gittenberger, 2010: Fig. 1B) (F) Juvenile C. signatum on Gorgonia ventalina (G) Cyphoma “black morph” on Eunicea tourneforti (H) C. mcgintyi from Florida, USA. 


Photos: (E–G) B.T. Reijnen, all from Curaçao; (H) Florida Museum of Natural History.   DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3018 



Bastian T. Reijnen​ and Sancia E.T. van der Meij. 2017. Coat of Many Colours — DNA Reveals Polymorphism of Mantle Patterns and Colouration in Caribbean Cyphoma Röding, 1798 (Gastropoda, Ovulidae).
PeerJ.  5:e3018.  DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3018


 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

[Herpetology • 2015] Odorrana lipuensis • A New Species of Odorrana inhabiting complete darkness in A Karst Cave in Guangxi, China


Odorrana lipuensis 
Mo, Chen, Wu, Zhang and Zhou, 2015


Abstract 
A new species of the genus Odorrana is described from a completely dark karst cave of northeastern Guangxi, southern China. The new species, Odorrana lipuensis sp. nov., can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of the following characters: medium size (SVL: 40.7–47.7 mm in males, 51.1–55.4 mm in females); tips of all but first finger expanded with circummarginal grooves; smooth, grass-green dorsum with irregular brown mottling; pineal body invisible; throat to upper abdomen with gray mottling; dorsal surfaces of limbs with brown bands; dorsolateral fold absent; tiny spinules on lateral body, temporal region, and anterior and posterior edge of tympanum; white nuptial pad present on finger I; males lacking vocal sacs; females having creamy yellow eggs, without black poles. Uncorrected sequence divergences between O. lipuensis sp. nov. and all homologous 16S rRNA sequences of Odorrana available on GenBank is equal to or greater than 4.9%. Currently, the new species is only known from the type locality. monophyletic group (Chen et al., 2013). All are known to be associated with mountain streams except O. wuchuanensis, which occurs in dark caves. During 2013–2014, eight Odorrana specimens were collected inside a completely dark karst cave in Lipu County, Guangxi Province, China. Morphologically, these specimens most closely resemble O. yizhangensis and O. schmackeri (Fei et al., 2009, 2012), but differ from O. yizhangensis, O. schmackeri and all other Odorrana from China and adjoining countries. They occur in a similar environment to O. wuchuanensis, inhabiting a dark cave, but are morphologically very different from O. wuchuanensis. Herein, we describe this population as a new species of Odorrana. 2. Materials and Methods 2.1 Sampling During 2013 and 2014, fieldwork was carried out in northeastern Guangxi, China (Figure 1A). Specimens were collected by hand, euthanized and fixed in 10% formalin and subsequently transferred to 75% ethanol for storage. Muscle tissues from three individuals were sampled and preserved in 100% ethanol for DNA extraction prior to fixing in formalin. All specimens and 

Keywords: Odorrana lipuensis sp. nov., karst cave, Guangxi, southern China




Type locality: a completely dark karst cave of Lipu County, Guangxi, China (182 m a.s.l.)

Etymology: Named after Lipu County, Guangxi 





Yunming Mo, Weicai Chen; Huaying Wu, Wei Zhang and Shichu Zhou. 2015. A New Species of Odorrana inhabiting complete darkness in A Karst Cave in Guangxi, China. Asian Herpetological Research. 6(1); 11–17.  DOI: 10.16373/j.cnki.ahr.140054

[Entomology • 2017] Auxicerus magnipunctatus • A New Species of the Stag Beetle Genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae)


Fig. 2. A–BAuxicerus platyceps Waterhouse, 1883. A. Holotype, ♂, BL 13 mm (BMNH). B. Head, ♂, BL 11 mm, Bolivia, Consata (EPCG). — CAuxicerus aethiops Jakowleff, 1900, holotype, ♂, BL 16 mm, Bolivia (ZIRAS). 
D–E. 
Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov., holotype, ♂, BL 10.7 mm (CBF). D. Dorsal habitus. E. Head. Diagnostic characters indicated by arrows: (1) ocellate punctures on mesosternum, (2) posterior end of ocular canthus, (3) anterior edge of ocular canthus and (4) antennal lamellae.   
Perger, Grossi & Guerra, 2017 
 Scale bars: A, C–D = 5 mm; B, E = 2.5 mm.   DOI: 10.5852/ejt.2016.302 

Abstract

 A new species of the Andean stag beetle genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883 is described from the humid Tucuman-Bolivian forest in the southern Bolivian Andes. Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. is distinguished from all congeners by the distinctly larger punctures of the mesosternum; antennomeres 2–6 subquadrate, last two joints of club wider than long; lamellae not widely separated; posterior end of ocular canthus rounded and anterior edge of canthus moderately developed into an obtuse triangle. Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. is possibly endemic to the Tucuman-Bolivian forest. Along with the presence of other endemic beetle species with tropical congeners, the discovery of A. magnipunctatus sp. nov. supports the idea that the persistence of rather tropical taxa in the subtropical realm is fostered by increased humidity at orographic rain barriers and climatic stability in the Tucuman-Bolivian forest. 

Keywords. Andes, Bolivia, Neotropical, South America, Tucuman-Bolivian forest. 


Taxonomy
Class Hexapoda Blainville, 1816
Order Coleoptera Linnaeus, 1758
Suborder Polyphaga Emery,1886

Superfamily Scarabaeoidea Latreille, 1802

Family Lucanidae Latreille, 1804
Subfamily Lucaninae Latreille, 1804

Genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883
Type species: Auxicerus platyceps Waterhouse, 1883 (by monotypy).

• Auxicerus platyceps Waterhouse, 1883
• Auxicerus multicolor (Boileau, 1897) 
• Auxicerus aethiops Jakowleff, 1900 

• Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. 

Differential diagnosis Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov. is distinguished from all congeners by the posterior end of the ocular canthus being rounded and the anterior edge of the canthus moderately developed into an obtuse tooth; distance between apex of teeth as wide as distance between outer eye margins (Fig. 2E). Antennomeres 2–6 subquadrate, last two joints of club wider than long; lamellae not widely separated from each other (Fig. 2E). Punctures of mesosternum larger; mesosternum concavity weak.

 Etymology: The species epithet is derived from the Latin ‘magna’ (large) and the Latin ‘punctatus’ (punctures), in reference to the large punctures all over the body

Fig. 2. A–BAuxicerus platyceps Waterhouse, 1883. A. Holotype, ♂, BL 13 mm (BMNH). B. Head, ♂, BL 11 mm, Bolivia, Consata (EPCG). — CAuxicerus aethiops Jakowleff, 1900, holotype, ♂, BL 16 mm, Bolivia (ZIRAS). — D–E. Auxicerus magnipunctatus sp. nov., holotype, ♂, BL 10.7 mm (CBF). D. Dorsal habitus. E. Head. Diagnostic characters indicated by arrows: (1) ocellate punctures on mesosternum, (2) posterior end of ocular canthus, (3) anterior edge of ocular canthus and (4) antennal lamellae.
Scale bars: A, C–D = 5 mm; B, E = 2.5 mm. 


Robert Perger, Paschoal Coelho Grossi and Fernando Guerra. 2017. Description of A New Species of the Stag Beetle Genus Auxicerus Waterhouse, 1883 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Lucanidae). European Journal of Taxonomy. 302: 1–10.  DOI: 10.5852/ejt.2016.302


[Entomology • 2017] Megalestes gyalsey (Odonata: Synlestidae) • Honouring His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Bhutan


Megalestes gyalsey
Gyeltshen, Kalkman & Orr, 2017

 
DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4244.4.9 

Abstract

Megalestes gyalsey spec. nov. is described from a single male from Trongsa District in Bhutan. The species was discovered during field work conducted in 2015 for the Bhutan invertebrate biodiversity project. The species is named in honour of His Royal Highness Crown Prince Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, the Gyalsey of Bhutan, on the occasion of his first birthday.

Keywords: Odonata, Damselfly, Zygoptera, Bhutan, Himalaya



Differential diagnosis. Megalestes and Sinolestes are the only damselfly genera in mainland Asia with a pterostigma that is at least twice as long as broad, a metallic green colouration and a total length of over 50 mm. The only genus matching the first two characters is Lestes, but the species of that genus are smaller and have R4 and Ir3 originating well proximal of the subnodus (at the subnodus in Megalestes and Sinolestes). Megalestes gyalsey can best separated from all other species of Megalestes and Sinolestes based on its anal appendages: the paraprocts are slightly over half the length of the cerci and have a relatively simple structure with the apical half consisting of a strong apically pointed gently curved finger-like process and lacking small upcurved spines. Figure 4c–f shows the anal appendages of Megalestes major and M. irma, the two other species of the genus known from Bhutan.

....

Etymology. The specific epithet gyalsey, is a noun in apposition. The species is named in honour of His Royal Highness Crown Prince of Bhutan, The Gyalsey, Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, on the occasion of his first birthday


Discussion: 
 Megalestes gyalsey is the eighteenth species of Megalestes. It is currently known only from the type locality in Bhutan but is likely to occur in adjacent areas of India and might be found in the eastern parts of Nepal. Further field work might result in the discovery of more species of Megalestes, especially in parts of China, but new species might yet be found in the Himalayan region as well. There is little information on the habitat and life history of Megalestes gyalsey or any other species of the genus Megalestes and it would be interesting to study the behaviour and seasonality of the species. Although only one location is known for the species, there is no reason to assume that it is threatened, as much probably suitable habitat is present in Bhutan. Nonetheless, it would be desirable to further explore the region in order to locate more populations.

Gyeltshen, T., V. J. Kalkman and Albert G. Orr. 2017. Honouring His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Bhutan: Megalestes gyalsey (Odonata: Synlestidae).
 Zootaxa. 4244(4); 588–594.  DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4244.4.9


[Arachnida • 2017] Troglotayosicus meijdeni • A New Species in the Troglomorphic Scorpion Genus Troglotayosicus from Colombia, Representing the Northernmost Known Record for the Genus (Scorpiones, Troglotayosicidae)


Troglotayosicus meijdeni 
Botero-Trujillo, González-Gómez, Valenzuela-Rojas & García, 2017


Abstract

We describe a new scorpion species in the troglomorphic genus Troglotayosicus Lourenço, 1981 from Colombia. Troglotayosicus meijdeni sp. nov. inhabits the forest leaf litter at Rivera municipality, on the western slope of the Eastern Andes. The male of the new species remains unknown; however, this species can be distinguished from other species in the genus by the female (and juvenile) morphology. The type locality of T. meijdeni sp. nov. represents the northernmost known record for a population of Troglotayosicus, further extending the known limits of distribution of this genus, and shedding more light on the distributional range of this group of scorpions in northwestern South America. With this description, the number of known species of Troglotayosicus is raised to four; three of them are endogean species living in forested areas in the Andean region of Colombia, whereas one is a hypogean species from a cave in Ecuadorian Amazonia.

Keywords: Scorpiones, Forest leaf litter, troglomorphism, taxonomy, Rivera, Huila


FIGURE 2. Troglotayosicus meijdeni sp. nov.,
Habitus of live female under laboratory conditions, lateral aspect. 

Taxonomy 
Family Troglotayosicidae Lourenço, 1998
 Troglotayosicus Lourenço, 1981 

Troglotayosicus meijdeni sp. nov.

Etymology. The species is named for Dr. Arie van der Meijden, who participated in the expedition that discovered this Troglotayosicus population. JCGG, JCVR and LFG would like to honor Van der Meijden for his collaboration with the BEA Group, to which they belong, in the study of Colombian biodiversity. Van der Meijden conducts research on scorpion biomechanics at CIBIO Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, InBIO, Universidade do Porto, Portugal.


Ricardo Botero-Trujillo, Julio C. González-Gómez, Juan C. Valenzuela-Rojas and Luis F. García. 2017. A New Species in the Troglomorphic Scorpion Genus Troglotayosicus from Colombia, Representing the Northernmost Known Record for the Genus (Scorpiones, Troglotayosicidae). Zootaxa. 4244(4); 568–582.   DOI:  10.11646/zootaxa.4244.4.7


[Botany • 2017] Waltillia hatschbachii • A New Monotypic Genus in Tillandsioideae (Bromeliaceae) Arises from A Rediscovered, Allegedly Extinct Species from Brazil


Waltillia hatschbachii
 (L. B. Smith & R. W. Read) Leme, Barfuss & Halbritter



Abstract

A new monotypic genus of Bromeliaceae, Waltillia, is described to accommodate a single rediscovered species, Waltillia hatschbachii, thought to be extinct and formerly placed in either Vriesea or Alcantarea. This new genus is ecologically and morphologically distinct from the remaining genera of subfamily Tillandsioideae in its unique combination of characters including those of habit, leaf rosette, leaf blades, flowers, petals, anthers, pollen, stigma, and seeds. Phylogenetic DNA sequence analyses indicate that the individuals of W. hatschbachii form a monophyletic, highly supported group in sister position to Alcantarea s.str., with Alcantarea and Waltillia being sister to the clade containing Vriesea s.str. and Stigmatodon.

Keywords: Alcantarea hatschbachii, Brazil, Campos Rupestres, Diamantina Plateau, DNA sequence phylogeny, morphology, new genus, Stigmatodon, Tillandsioideae, Vriesea hatschbachii, Vrieseinae, Monocots


Flowering individuals of Waltillia hatschbachii in the Campos Rupestres at the type locality near Gouveia, Minas Gerais state.  

TAXONOMY
Waltillia Leme, Barfuss & Halbritter, gen. nov.

Diagnosis:— This new genus differs from AlcantareaStigmatodon, and Vriesea by its unique combination of morphological characters, such as unappendaged petals 4 to 6 times longer than wide, forming a narrow campanulate corolla, pollen with the sulcus margins more or less well defined but not sharply cut, the sulcus covered with a kind of operculum of almost smooth exine elements with some perforations, stigma of the convolute-blade II type, and seeds with a basal appendage equalling to distinctly shorter than the apical appendage.

Type:—Vriesea hatschbachii L. B. Sm. & R. W. Read.

A. Flowering individulas of Waltillia hatschbachii in its Campos Rupestres habitat, along a spring, in Santana do Pirapama county. B. General view of Campos Rupestres vegetation in the habitat of Waltillia hatschbachii at the type locality near Gouveia, Minas Gerais state. C, D. Detail of a simple inflorescences of Waltillia hatschbachii from Gouveia county. 

  Flowering individuals of Waltillia hatschbachii in the Campos Rupestres at the type locality near Gouveia, Minas Gerais state. 

Etymology:— This new genus honors the botanist Walter Till, Curator of the Herbarium of the Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, leading authority in Bromeliaceae in general, and in subfamily Tillandsioideae in especial. 


Waltillia hatschbachii (L. B. Smith & R. W. Read) Leme, Barfuss & Halbritter, comb. nov. 
Basionym:—Vriesea hatschbachii L. B. Smith & R. W. Read, Phytologia 30(5): 292. 1975. Type:—BRAZIL. Minas Gerais: Gouveia, side of a rock slope by BR 259, 21 January 1972, G. Hatschbach 29085, L.B. Smith & E. Ayensu (holotype US!, isotype MBM!). ≡ Alcantarea hatschbachii (L. B. Sm. & R. W. Read) Leme, Bromélia 2(3): 22. 1995, syn. nov.

.....


Elton M. C. Leme, Heidemarie Halbritter and Michael H. J. Barfuss. 2017. Waltillia, A New Monotypic Genus in Tillandsioideae (Bromeliaceae) Arises from A Rediscovered, Allegedly Extinct Species from Brazil. Phytotaxa. 299;(1); 1–35. DOI:  10.11646/phytotaxa.299.1.1

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

[Invertebrate • 2017] Additions of New Species to Thelepus (Thelepodidae), with Description of A New Terebellides (Trichobranchidae) from Taiwan


Thelepus hemeiensis Hsueh & Li, 2017


Abstract

Following a recent report on two new species of Thelepus for the Taiwan, we describe two more new species, Thelepus hemeiensis sp. nov. and Thelepus wuchiensis sp. nov., for the genus. In addition, a new species of the Family Trichobranchidae is also described, Terebellides baliensis sp. nov., which was collected from an offshore monitoring survey in northwestern Taiwan. The genus Terebellides as well as the Family Trichobranchidae are reported for the first time from Taiwanese waters.

Keywords: Annelida, Taxonomy, terebelliform polychaetes

Thelepus hemeiensis sp. nov. Holotype (NMNS7743-1): A, life animal 

Thelepus hemeiensis

Etymology. The name is derived from the name of the fishing port where the worm was collected. 

Type locality. Wuchi fishing port, Taichung, Taiwan.

 Distribution. Only known from the type locality




Pan-Wen Hsueh and Kuo-Rong Li. 2017.  Additions of New Species to Thelepus (Thelepodidae), with Description of A New Terebellides (Trichobranchidae) from Taiwan. Zootaxa.  4244(3); 429–439. DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4244.3.10


  

Hsueh, P.-W. and Li, K.-R. 2016. New species of Thelepodidae (Terebelliformia, Polychaeta) from Taiwan. Zootaxa. 4170(3); 510–524.  DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4170.3.5